The cause of bruxism is still unknown. However, it is believed that increased stress and anxiety can greatly increase how often and how severely you grind your teeth. Having an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth are also thought to contribute to teeth grinding.


Occasional bruxism usually does not result in damage to the teeth or jaw. However, chronic teeth grinding can cause serious dental issues.
In some cases, grinding can result in tooth fracture, loosening of teeth, or the loss of a tooth or teeth. Grinding over years without treatment can wear the teeth down to stumps, which will require bridges, crowns, root canals, implants, or possibly even dentures to repair.
Not only is bruxism bad for your teeth, it is also damaging to the jaw. Grinding can result in hearing loss, change the appearance of your face.


Being fitted for a mouth guard/night guard will help protect your teeth from the effects of grinding while you sleep. However, in order to cease grinding completely it's important to treat the triggers for why you grind your teeth. If stress is causing your bruxism, ask our doctors about stress reduction techniques and options. Exercise, stress counseling, or prescription muscle relaxers may help reduce how often or severely you grind your teeth.